About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
WETA 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
did was hit a james brown tune. [singing] walking out, they heard that and they made an about-face. popped out inad the back and it was bill graham. he always liked rhythm and horns. i flew to detroit the next day. if nothing happens, i'm not coming back. he was devastated. he said, you've got to come back. they dug it. who? bill graham. hock the organ and send me a ticket. [laughter] tavis: let me ask you to set your modesty aside just for a second. the me what you think contribution over these 45 years of this band tower of power has been to the business? people playingg, real music. literate lyrics, musical songs and high performance levels. all of those things, trying to serve our fans and do what we do. there were trends through the years. we thought it was disco that was our lives. tavis: blame it on disco. >> smooth jazz, whenever we deviated which we tried a few times, it never worked out for us. we stick to our guns now, and a high level of musicianship. tavis: the flip side of that lowest configuration. you tell me a lot tower of power the high point in ? we had rick
, the risk of concussions and how parents should weigh the tradeoffs. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: the n.f.l. is already playing under a new spotlight on concussions. days before the season began, the league agreed to a $765 million settlement with 4,500 former players. they'd charged that owners concealed information on the effects of repeated head injuries. that history was the focus of a pbs "frontline" investigation that aired earlier this month on the links between head injuries and brain disease. now, a new study explores the risks for athletes well before they reach their college and professional years. the report by the institute of medicine-- a non-profit, independent organization-- focuses on sports-related concussions in youth, from elementary school through adolescence. one member of the panel, dr. frederick rivara-- of the university of washington school of medicine-- pointed to a key problem: the lack of data for this age group. >> there's essentially nothing known about concussions in elementary school and middle aged kids. and that's really why there's a need for m
qualifies for bankruptcy protection. jeffrey brown gets the latest. >> brown: the day started with testimony from kevyn orr, the city's emergency manager. then for three hours, michigan governor rick snyder, who appointed orr, took the stand. it's the first time in modern state history a governor testified in court, and he faced a series of questions from the unions and retirees about whether the state and the city really did all they could do to avoid moving into bankruptcy. christy mcdonald of detroit public television was in the courtroom today, and joins me now. welcome to you. but first remind us briefly the issue in this trial is whether the city can go ahead with its bankruptcy process, right? >> right. it has to prove that it's insolvent and that's what they are seek for bankruptcy protection right now. but what the opposition wants to know is did detroit actually negotiate in good faith before they filed for bankruptcy. >> brown: all right, so today you heard from governor rick snyder, what were the lawyers opposing him arguing and what was his response? >> well, jeffrey, it was far
at the plain speech and droll wit of one of the country's foremost poets. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. the. >> brown: the trouble of poetry is that it encourages the writing of more poetry, more guppys crowding the fish tank. lines from billy collins, former poet laureate and one of the nation's best known poets. his new collection is titled "aimless love: new and selected poems "from his work of the last decade. welcome to you. >> thank you very much, jeff. >> brown: i thought i would sfrel a blur northbound this book. alice fulton writes "billy collins put the fun back in profundity." are you consciously aiming for fun? are you constantly aiming for pro fund any what are you doing? >> well, there's a lot of unconscious activity that goes on in the composition of a poem so i can't -- i can't picture myself starting out aiming to do anything, having much of an agenda. i think in writing a poem i'm making some tonal adjustments and it took me a long time to allow anything like fun into my poetry. >> brown: it did? >> well, i thought originally when i was in school and i wa
, but by far less: $4 billion over ten years. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown takes a closer look at the immediate impact of these changes and what may lie ahead. >> brown: we explore some of the changes on the table with ellen teller of the food research and action center, a not-for-profit that works with hundreds of groups around the country to eradicate hunger. and robert rector is with the heritage foundation. his work on this is considered influential with republican members in congress. welcome to both of you. ellen teller, this immediate action, cutting back assistance, allowing what was considered a temporary increase to lapse, you don't think this is a good idea? >> no, i don't. initially when congress was drafting the recovery act they put in place this boost in snap or food stamp allotments and it was never intended to affect a family by seeing a reduction from one month to the next but because of congressional interference today we are seeing a cliff so a family going in for grocery store today will see every snap household will see a reduction in their monthly benefits lower than what
to the writing process to decide maybe one day you will want to write? question theout people at little brown have been so wonderful that it feels like the idea of writing a book one day is incredibly appealing to me. though i don't know what it would he, my guess is the first book i would do would be a kids could do somei graphics as well. it was a blast reading this as well. it is amazing. how fun was it doing the trailer ? >> it was amazing. the best thing was we could do it, itg, and what we saw was cool enough it felt like a compelling enough piece to put it out there. i think in 48 hours there were 2 million plus views. it happened quickly. i am just hoping people are curious and check it out because they will be happy with the book. tavis: i don't want to cover this question too much. we talked a lot about your creativity, and this clearly falls in the realm of creativity. i wonder if you might also speak to the value you have not just for creativity but for innovation. this is not just creativity. this is innovation. you have done this with some of your other work, but just talk about
charges against the firm. jeffrey brown takes a deeper look at the violations in question and what the case may suggest about the government's broader investigations into wall street practices. >> brown: steven cohen is not just any trader. he was one of the street's best known traders. and his firm was one of the more successful, with a record of >> sheila kolhatkar national correspondent from business week has been connick elling b the case if he press conference today. i want to pick up on this notion of the success in pursuit of the wall street firm on criminal charges that has been a rare thing, right? >> generally the government has been reluctant to charge companies with criminal wrongdoing because it can lead to enormous job losses. now they did in this case because they have been investigating this firm for going on seven years now, they were quite convinced, apparently, that both steve cohen and those work for him were engaging in some kind of wong going-- doing. but they were unable to do a criminal case against c mr. cohen himself. they did not have the evidence they ne
. >> reporter: despite all of those concerns, mark brown is now working with oil and gas companies that are fracking in pennsylvania. brownstein says the environmental group isn't in favor of fracking but it is in favor of using more natural gas as an alternative to coal because gas is cleaner. a new report by the environmental protection agency says that u.s. power plants have recently cut their total greenhouse gas emissions by more than 6%. mostly because so many have switched from coal to gas. brownstein believes natural gas is the fossil fuel we should be using until we get our energy from renewable resources like wind and solar power. >> that's what we want but we also understand that it's going to take some time to get there. and the question is, what do you do in the meantime? >> so a little over two years ago the environmental defense fund started to talk to the companies fracking for gas in pennsylvania. the ones that so many other environmentalists see as the enemy. >> and in order to make change, you have to take the time to learn their industry, learn their concerns an
brown passed -- just signed a bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour -- >> but didn't he oppose that last year? >> he wouldn't do it a year ago, but he's doing it now. why? because he's responding to the strikes of the fast food workers, to the organizing of the wal-mart workers, to the public opinion polls that show that an overwhelming majority of americans believe that if you work full time, you should not live in poverty, that the minimum wage still leaves you desperately below the poverty line. and governor brown realized that. he also recently signed a bill to give driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants, to provide a "domestic workers' bill of rights" to match new york's domestic workers bill of rights. there are legislative changes that are happening all over the country that are the result of these movements. think about if this were january of 1960 and i said to you, "bill, there's going to be a new civil rights movement mostly among young people." you'd probably think like many people thought, i was crazy. but yet on february 1st, 1960 four college students in no
don't have time to look at this little brown baby. >> and in this scenario i am assuming it is a little indian baby, if it is a white baby i would say that is disgusting, white babies are gross, i'm sorry. they are like regular babies that aren't ripe yet. >> rose: do you write all the time? do you co constantly wri? >> i do, at a certain point, you know, sometimes i would take a break from like writing the stand-up and then i realized that is dumb and i should just keep going because you get in a groove and, you know, even with this new special, i am kind of at the point where it is kind of close to being done and then i just hit like a new topic i really want to get into. i went to a friend's wedding and, you know, i talk about marriage and how scary it is and everything and i saw my friend's wedding and his vows and the girl's vows were unbelievable, so beautiful, like everyone in the audience was really moved, and i just heard it like, wow, if i felt that, i wouldn't be scared of marriage at all. and then i just started writing about that, and about divorce and, you
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)